MEMBRANES FOR

NET ZERO

In industrial countries, 30% of all energy usage is down to industry production – half of that usage is chemical separation.

Improving membrane separation technology can cut energy usage by 90%. To combat climate change and reach global targets, it is fundamental that we stop overlooking this impact and drive improvements in membrane separate efficiency.

WHAT DO WE MEAN BY NET ZERO

The concept of Net Zero carbon emissions emerged from physical climate science but has become operationalized through social, political and economic systems. In simple terms, Net Zero Carbon, also known as carbon neutrality, refers to the balance between the amount of greenhouse gases (GHGs) produced and the amount removed from the atmosphere. In industrial terms, it means lowering carbon intensity scores through reducing operational emissions whilst also removing or “offsetting” to reach zero.

WHY WE CARE ABOUT NET ZERO

IT’S GOOD NEWS FOR OUR CUSTOMERS

Our membrane separation technology is designed to help ethanol producers achieve a higher quality product while also reducing energy and water usage. Making more ethanol with fewer resources is a major win for all involved – planet, people and profit.

THE SPOTLIGHT IS ON INDUSTRY

The industrial processes involved in separating the components of chemical mixtures account for 10–15% of the world’s total energy consumption. The more energy consumed, the more greenhouse gases (GHGs) are emitted into the atmosphere, and the more the earth’s temperature rises. Through the use of membrane separation technologies such as ours, we can combat this impact as we strive towards a net zero future.

A CLEAR TARGET FOR THE WORLD

In December 2021 the world’s nations agreed that as a minimum we need to limit global warming to 1.5˚C above pre-industrial levels by the end of this century. To achieve that, global industries need to be operating at net zero emissions by 2050* – this means any GHGs emitted are to be offset by at least the same amount. We need to step up our efforts, because right now we are on course for warming in excess of 2˚C. This calls for membrane separation technology, pioneered by Whitefox.

A half degree difference in the average global temperature may seem small…

…until you weigh up the consequences.

Extreme Heat
Water Shortages
Flooding
Biodiversity
Marine Life

Extreme Heat

An increase of 1.5°C means temperatures on land could rise by 3°C to 4.5°C.

Exceptionally hot days will become the norm, and extreme heatwaves are projected to affect around 14% of the earth’s population. At a 2°C increase, that figure rises to 37%. Limiting warming to 1.5°C means we can prevent 420,000,000 people from experiencing extreme heat.

Water Shortages

A 1.5°C increase is projected to impact the availability of water in many areas.

Depending on future socioeconomic conditions, a 2°C rise will see more than 61,000,000 exposed to severe drought and other types of water shortages. Limiting warming to 1.5°C means that up to half the world’s population will be spared from climate-induced water stress.

Flooding

A 1.5°C increase will spare many regions from experiencing extreme rainfall.

At 2°C, Northern Europe and mountainous regions in Northern America will be prone to flood risks, and high-latitude countries such as Iceland, Greenland, and Alaska will also be affected by extreme precipitation.

Biodiversity and Ecosystems

A 1.5°C warmer world: 8% of plants, 6% of insects, and 4% of vertebrates will be drastically affected by a 50% reduction in viable geographic range.

At 2°C, the percentage of flora and fauna affected more than doubles. Forest fires are also predicted to destroy large areas of the Amazon, an area that’s critical for the world’s biodiversity.

Marine Life

The ocean absorbs vast quantities of heat from greenhouse gases, sequestering around a third of the
world’s carbon dioxide.

Increased absorption means rising ocean temperatures and acidification, with associated risks for a range of marine life that includes coral, algae, and fish. There is substantial evidence that even an increase of 1.5°C will cause a 70%decline in coral reef viability. At 2°C, that number rises to 99%.

LET US HELP YOU ACHIEVE YOUR TARGET

NET ZERO

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